Robert Hengeveld – July 2

"Staging the Gap"

Robert Hengeveld's exhibition Staging the Gap
was presented at Video Pool's studio (3rd Floor, 100 Arthur
Street).

Winnipeg, MB (July 2, 2008)
Video Pool Media Arts Centre was pleased to present Staging the
Gap, a provocative media installation by Toronto-based artist, Robert
Hengeveld.


Staging
the Gap is a miniature model of a concert stage with silently animated
lights and smoke. The work explores the relationship of fact and
fiction in a technologically mediated world. Hengeveld critically
reflects on the mechanisms used to deliver popular culture by focusing
on how visual effects – stage lights, pyrotechnics, and dry ice – are
used at concerts to shape our understanding of what we hear. Ignoring
society’s desire for the spectacle of performance, the stage created by
the artist remains empty while a precisely orchestrated light show
plays out.


Accompanying
the miniature stage was a series of headphone each playing a different
audio track specifically composed in response to the orchestrated light
show. This inverted the traditional relationship of audio and visual
experience in concert settings and addresses the role of audio in
shaping our understanding of the world.


Hengeveld's
model stage measured 2.5m2 to establish a scale at which viewers are
encompassed by the work, yet still feel slightly detached. Hengeveld also
coaxed audiences from their suspended disbelief into his alternate
reality by offering a familiar space and encouraging them to relate in
a familiar manner. This subtle slip from the norm created a situation
that challenged preconceptions while fostering a reevaluation of our
spatial environments and our positions within them.

This
exhibition ran from July 29 – August 21, 2008 and was available
weekdays from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. at Video Pool's Studio (100 Arthur Street, 3rd Floor).

The exhibition launch was on Friday, July 25
Artist
talk began at 6:00 p.m. in Winnipeg Film Group's Studio; Reception
followed at Video Pool – both venues are on the 3rd floor at 100
Arthur Street.

ARTIST
BIO — Robert Hengeveld completed his MFA at the University of Victoria
in 2005 and received a Fine Arts Diploma and Certificate from Georgian
College, and an AOCAD from the Ontario College of Art and Design. He
has exhibited his work across Canada and internationally, and has
participated in artist residencies in both Canada and Scotland. He is
currently living and working in Toronto.

These exhibition is presented thanks to generous financial support from:

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25th Anniversary Commissioned Works – March 26

Video Pool Media Arts Centre proudly celebrated 25 years of
support to Manitoban artists through the commission of six projects by
seven artists who have made dynamic contributions to Video Pool's
history and to media arts in Canada.



Daniel Barrow. Still from "Trying to Love the Normal Amount", 2008

Temporarily Out of Order: Downtime, curated by Sigrid Dahle, and Seen/Unseen: Light Play, curated by Grant Guy,
embraced themes emphasizing key notions and material qualities
particular to media arts practices. The themes befit the occasion of
Video Pool’s anniversary by simultaneously harkening back to media
art’s primal scene of light first being captured as image, and
anticipating the future of new media art as a form being assimilated
rapidly into larger cultural discourses while outmoded technologies
decay. At times, media art is approached as a problem: what is the
importance of new technologies to new media works, and what happens
when the technologies don’t work?

The curators noticed a
curious shift in media arts practices – as technology-based arts have
matured, artists appeared to be using electronic media to replicate the
past rather than to speculate on the future. They described an aesthetic
attitude particularly suited to Winnipeg as a city equally haunted and
inspired by the past. It was a view of technology as something mythical
and broken, as opposed to clean and slick.

The commissioned works purposefully introduced a ghost into the machine of media art. Daniel Barrow
worked with outdated technologies, such as an ‘80s era Amiga editing
station and an overhead projector to re-imagine early animation
techniques.
Peter Courtemanche and Lori Weidenhammer evoked Dr. Frankenstein through the haunting of clothing with circuitry to electronically revive mythological creatures. Richard Dyck encouraged us to scrutinize the surface of a mysteriously ominous vintage photograph. Steven Loft
explored societal rather than technological disintegration by drawing
attention to the racism exhibited by the broken down and the down and
out. Injecting manipulated images of the natural world into constructed
environments,
Sharon Alward and Victoria Prince
escaped the hustle of our technology-obsessed society to achieve time
and space for meditative contemplation. Most significantly, each of the
featured projects focused on creating an active media arts experience.

The works were showcased over
six weeks as follows:

With an illustrious honour from the Toronto Images Festival (April 3-13, 2008) Daniel Barrow's work
was presented at the Plug In ICA's satellite space, which is at 290
McDemot Ave. The exhibition opened on Saturday, April 12 and ran until
Saturday April 19.
On that note, at the
Images Festival Award Daniel was presented with the Prize for Best Canadian Media Artwork for his performance project,
Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry.


Winnipeg based multi- disciplinary artist Victoria Prince's  sculptural video installation was presented at the Adhere and Deny Pocket Theatre on 70 Albert Street on April 18 and ran until April 25th, 2008

Richard Dyck's new media installation, The day we cut Nettie's curls, she was 7 years old, was presented on April 2nd at  Aceartinc on 290 McDermot Ave and continued on until May 2nd, 2008.

Peter Courtemanche and Lori Weidenhammer's "The Laughing Dress" performed on April 24th and 25th at the PLATFORM Centre for Photographic + Digital Arts, on100 Arthur St.

Steve Lofts's " A History of Two Parts" opened May 6 at The Duke of Kent Legion, on 227 McDermot Ave.
The exhibition was presented in-part through the generosity of On Screen Manitoba

Sharon Alward's latest collaboration with Alex Poruchnyk, a
performance-driven video installation titled
Bushi,
opened Friday May 16th and continued on until May 24, 2008. The work
was showcased from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. at the Rachel Browne Theater, which
is on 211 Bannatyne Ave. (formerly the Winnipeg Contemprary Dancers
Studio).

For more information about Sharon Alward and Bushi, please visit: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~alward/Bushi and http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~alward/Bushi2.htm

Video
Pool's 25th Anniversary Commissions were made possible by the generous
support of the Winnipeg Arts Council through the New Creations Fund.
Further financial contributions have been kindly provided by:






Video
Pool is also pleased to acknowledge contributions from numerous local
organizations; we are deeply grateful for their partnership and
assistance:

ADHERE + DENY

The Duke of Kent Legion

Reviews and Previews:


Video Pool marks 25 years with new works

Stacey Abrahamson, Winnipeg Free Press, April 25, 2008

Video Pool Media Arts Centre has much to celebrate on its 25th birthday.

The
organization has promoted, pushed and loved video art since the early
days of the medium. Rooted in community art ideals, Video Pool has been
one of the most welcoming homes of creativity in Canada — it began as
a way for artists interested in working in video to "pool" together
their resources.

To
celebrate its anniversary, Video Pool commissioned six new media art
works by Prairie artists through local curators Grant Guy and Sigrid
Dahle. Each of these works gets a one-week run at various locations in
the Exchange District. Dahle commissioned Richard Dyck, Steven Loft and
the collaborative artistic duo of Peter Courtemanche and Lori
Weidenhammer through the curatorial concept of
Temporarily out of order: downtime. Seen/Unseen is the curatorial vision of Guy through the work of Sharon Alward, Daniel Barrow and Victoria Prince.

Guy's
curatorial intent has more to do with performance-based artists and
their works, while Dahle's intent has more to do with the
vulnerabilities that occur within both the technology surrounding video
and the artists who make the works. Both concepts are true to the
beginnings of Video Pool, where both performance and conceptual art
came together to create a base for artists looking to explore the new
medium of video art.

The works by Dyck and Prince are currently showing. Barrow's Trying to Love the Normal Amount
was the first of the works to debut in the city on April 12. Barrow
normally performs his animations by overlapping colourful
transparencies onto one another to create movement and life on screen.
In this case, he puts the role of performer onto the audience. Audience
members are invited to perform the work through the directions on a
screen that's set up like a karaoke prompter. They are asked to play
out the sad tale of a woman looking for love and comfort.

Dyck's work always has a feeling of home and history. His video The day we cut Nettie's curls, she was 7 years old
is no different. Taking the story behind a 1947 photograph, Dyck
creates a 3-D environment that explores the twists and turns of its
tale. The environment is a series of black and white hills and gorges
that the viewer travels through with the assistance of a glowing tonal
orb. The sadness and strength of the story that is told through text on
the screen is heightened by the silence in the room and the 3-D space.
Dyck invites the viewers to ponder the scene and story that is given to
them through the serenity of the created artificial hush of its
backdrop.

Walking up
the stairs to Prince's installation, the viewer is pummelled with the
powerful fragrance of incense. When the viewer reaches the top of the
stairs and the entrance to the installation room, the scent becomes
almost unbearable. The candle-lit room holds
Light and Alter,
Prince's glistening watery installation. Two Plexiglas waterfalls stand
on either side of a stone- and salt-laden path leading into a video
projection and light. Viewers are invited to walk through the path to
what Prince calls a "tabernacle."

She
creates a new media metaphor of spirituality that is not only witnessed
but experienced, and is unlike any work she has done before.

Still
to come are works by Alward, Loft and the duo of Courtemanche and
Weidenhammer, details of which can be found on the Video Pool website.

The
six commissions and artists represent a sampling of the best artists
working in new media in Canada. It is a fabulous way to celebrate the
organization's achievements and is indicative of the creative and
conceptual past it has had and the potential of its future.

Into the Light

Check out this fantastic 25th Anniversary coverage by Whitney Light that appeared in an edition of Uptown.

Click on the image to read the full article…

We were very happy to discover Walter Forsberg's preview of our 25th Anniversary programming in Uptown Magazine. We're sure this will mean an even bigger party tonight!

Click on the image for a larger version…

25 Years of Video Pool

Mike Landry, walrusmagazine.com/blogs, April 16th, 2008

To celebrate its twenty-fifth anniversary, Winnipeg’s

Video Pool

media art centre made a poster detailing its history. But the
twenty-five year history of an artist-run centre is as harried as they
come. Rather than a straight timeline, Video Pool’s history looks more
like a brainstorming session gone wrong. In the aptly titled

The Incomplete, Contested, Anecdotal, Unedited, Messy, Nostalgic, Faulty, Controversial History of Video Pool So Far…

,bubbles of people, places, moments in time, and minor scandals are connected with AV cables.

But
Video Pool isn’t just celebrating their milestone with a poster. For
the next month Video Pool takes Winnipeg by storm with six commissioned
works from the centre at spaces around town.

The works are from two big names in Winnipeg: Sigrid Dahle, and Grant Guy.
Dahle has been living and working as a risk-taking independent curator
in Winnipeg about as long as Video Pool has been around. Guy, who comes
from a background in theatre, has been involved with the centre from
the very beginning.

Video
Pool’s initial idea was to have the curators explore media art’s past,
present, and future. But both Dahle and Guy took that theme in their
own direction, and commissioned artists at different stages in their
career who all have ties to Video Pool. Having a diverse representation
is always important to Video Pool, says programming coordinator Milena
Placentile.

“It’s really about
keeping the dialogue going between different generations and making
sure everyone has access to what they need at all points in their
career.”

Dahle commissioned Steven Loft, Richard Dyck,
and Lori Weidenhammer and Peter Courtemanche to explore “the
implications of an artwork in which vulnerability, failure,
requirements for regular maintenance and a reliance on (unstable)
shared networks are foregrounded?” Loft tackles the question with a
video installation tackling the racism, violence, and filth of an
average Manitoba video lottery terminal-cursed bar. Weidenhammer and
Courtemanche combine performance and sound art with a dress laden with
speakers. But it’s Dyck who takes the cake for the most mind-altering
reaction to Dahle’s question, “How might [a] piece’s ‘malfunctioning’
serve to create a time and space for quiet contemplation and memory.”
He does this with a computer program simulating a camera moving through
a 3D rendering of a photograph from 1947 according to mathematical
algorithms that result in a new video each time. Yowzah.

Guy combined his theatrical background with the performance aspects of media art. He did this by asking Daniel Barrow, Victoria Prince, and Sharon Alward
to address the concept of light as material or metaphor. Barrow does
this a do-it-yourself version of his famed overhead projection
performance. Alward brings a healthy dose of insanity with her
not-quite-in-performance piece featuring martial arts and one-on-one
tea ceremonies. And Prince used her commission as an opportunity to
branch out from her single-channel work, presenting a video-based
sculptural installation that includes water and salt, among other
things.

For those familiar
with Video Pool from the beginning, it should be no surprise they used
this celebration to commission new work. That’s exactly why Video Pool
was founded in the first place. Well, that and to pool video resources.

“That
it is something designed with a celebration in mind and also designed
specifically for our programming as opposed to just supporting
production in principle makes it quite original for what we normally
undertake,” says Placentile.

Because
Video Pool doesn’t have its own programming space, it has partnered
with several Winnipeg galleries and theatres to exhibit the new works.
With such a tight-knit community though it wasn’t a problem getting
collaborators for Video Pool’s celebration. For Placentile, who moved
to Winnipeg from Toronto recently, it’s exactly this atmosphere that
attracted her.

“Whether it’s
something as simple as loaning equipment and then even sharing space,
it can just happen in a flash. Everyone realizes how important it is to
do that to be here and be successful”

For
a little film collective that blossomed into a non-profit artist-run
centre, Video Pool certainly has grown up. Rightly, this celebration
marks its most ambitious year yet. Increased planning has led to more
generous grants, which in turn has led to more programming. There’s
even talk of trying to tour the six new works. With their artists
becoming more and more recognized, Video Pool is starting to receive
replies to their emails from around the world.

In
Winnipeg though, people just appreciate that Video Pool exists. With
new and expensive technologies like high-definition media, the centre
is the only place where many artists can dream of accessing these
high-end materials.

“It’s hard
for people to enter, and they have ideas of what they want to make and
do, and being part of a larger community makes it all possible,” says
Placentile. “This is what drew me to Winnipeg, and Video Pool really
embodies it.

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Jessica Thompson- Invisible Cities


(in)visible cities included live performances by an array of internationally renowned artists including: Cheryl L’Hirondelle (Vancouver), Shawna Dempsey and Lorri Millan (Winnipeg), FASTWÜRMS (Creemore, ON), Jessica Thompson (Toronto), and Nhan Duc Nguyen (Vancouver). Cultural theorist Jeanne Randolph (Winnipeg) will act as (in)visible cities’ rapporteur/blogger, providing insightful commentary as festival events unfold.

To further engage audiences as both participants in and witnesses of the work, (in)visible cities  presented two performance workshops:

Performance and Activism in Everyday Life, led by Cheryl L'Hirondelle, Shawna Dempsey and Lorri Millan, is a two-day workshop expanding ideas of performance art practice in relation to collaboration, community, and activism.

Freestyle SoundHack, led by Jessica Thompson, is a one-day workshop/performance
involving the creation of wearable sound pieces that generate and
broadcast electronic beats as users move through urban environments.

(in)visible cities also included a round-table discussion on performance practice, identity, community, agency and place.

The
city – our city – is network of living cultures with heterogeneous but
intersecting communities, systems, flows and struggles. Through
presenting performance works that play out a variety of modes of social
interaction with audiences, (in)visible cities provided an arena in which to further animate the stories, histories and economies of the Exchange District.

(in)visible cities gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the Winnipeg Arts Council’s Downtown Festival Grant Program, the Manitoba Arts Council, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Generous in-kind support is provided by Canadian Goodwill Industries Corporation, Little Saigon Restaurant, and Kensington Building Ltd.

Sincere thanks also to our donors, members and volunteers; and to our community, and friends and family.

Jessica Thompson's Freestyle SoundHack

Saturday, September 13 from 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Video Pool Media Arts Centre and other Exchange District sites

Jessica Thompson presented Freestyle SoundHack, a collaborative performance in the form of a workshop. The performance/workshop involved building Freestyle SoundKits
– wearable sound pieces prototyped by the artist – that generate and
broadcast electronic beats as users move through the urban environment.
During the performance, the artist gave her project to the public
by teaching workshop participants how to make their own Freestyle SoundKits, which they can distribute as they wish, using whatever sounds they choose.

The workshop began at Video Pool with a Freestyle SoundKits building
session, followed by live sonic and movement-based interventions in the
public spaces of the Exchange District. Thompson regards her
transmission of open-source technological skill as the core component
of the performance. She is interested in sharing technological
knowledge so that the sonic transformation of public space becomes less
of a specialized artistic activity and more of an ordinary occurrence.

The
workshop/performance was open to any one 14 years and older. No previous
electronics, hacking, coding or performance experience was needed – just
a desire to experiment and play.

Enrollment was limited to 10 participants and was available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The
fee for the workshop was $40, which coverd the cost of workshop
materials.

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Camera-Free Film and Video – February 13

Winnipeg, MB (January
23, 2008) – We can always trust artists to challenge assumptions and to
seek creative alternatives to conventional practices. In the case of
film and video, this is also true.

This screening featured
experimental techniques for moving image creation and manipulation
including: machinima (film and video made using avatars and/or video
game environments), computer-based image manipulation, well-established
filmmaking techniques such as hand processing, optical printing, and
scratch animation, as well as work employing modified cameras or found
footage.

Curated through an open call for submissions, Camera-Free Film and Video showcases
provocative non-traditional film and video produced by artists from
diverse cultural backgrounds and communities. We were pleased to
present the work of a number of local artists, underscoring Winnipeg's
rich contribution to experimental film and video making in this country.

Featured artists includeed: 

"Five Cents a Copy" Ed Ackerman & Gregory Zbitnew (Winnipeg)
"The Death of Natural Language" Clint Enns (Winnipeg)
"Turku Goes Oukkidoukki" Gun Holström (Helsinki)
"American Singles" Ian Robert MacTilstra (Vancouver)
"Asleep at the Wheel" Mike Maryniuk (Winnipeg)
"Pants!" Divya Mehra (Winnipeg/New York)
"Traffiic" Robert Pasternak (Winnipeg)
"Rectangular World" Andrew James Patterson (Toronto)
"Isolating Landscapes" Heidi Phillips (Winnipeg)
"Winged Victory" Victoria Prince (Winnipeg)
"Telephone and Distant Conversation" Nicole Shimonek (Winnipeg/London, UK)
"Malfunction 2.0" Murray Toews (Winnipeg)
"Tilted" Kai Ling Xue (Vancouver)
"Niverville, MB, 08.04" Collin Zipp (Winnipeg)

These
artists don't take the camera for granted in their image-making
process, but rather break it, bend it or toss it out altogether. Images
are created and manipulated using low-tech (scratch animation) and very
high-tech (custom-made algorithms) techniques.

Freed of camera work, these artists discover new creative territory and advance experimental film and video practice.

Wednesday, February 13, 2008
The Cinematheque Theatre, 100 Arthur St.
Admission is free of charge

This one-night only screening began at 7:30 p.m. and was followed by a Q&A session, and a reception at Platform Gallery.

Video
Pool thanks the Winnipeg Film Group's Cinematheque and Platform Gallery
for their generous presentation support. Video Pool  also wishes to
acknowledge the generosity of our funders: The Canada Council for the
Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council, and the Winnipeg Arts Council.

Photos

The
diverse selection of work proved quite substantial and between
laughter, solemnity, and awe, attendees were presented with a great
deal to mull over. Dynamic conversation, along with food and drink,
were shared across the hallway at PLATFORM.

Thank you to all
everyone who joined us! We look forward to presenting another equally
intriguing thematic single channel screening next year!























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Arts Birthday January 17

Video Pool Media Arts Centre Celebrated Art’s 1,000,045th 2008 Birthday at Club Desire on 441 Main St.

Video Pool is extremely grateful to have received such generous support
from so many local friends including merchants, arts organizations, an
art collective, and a band.


Enormous thanks are owed to:
Advance Electronics
American Flamewhip
L’Atelier national du Manitoba
Aqua Books
Bikram Yoga Winnipeg
Blue Earth Organics
BorderCrossings Magazine
Cinematheque
The Fyxx
Hooper’s Bazaar
The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, Manitoba
Into the Music
Kustom Kulture
The Line Up
Mac Helper
MAWA
Mondragon
Mother’s Music/The Drum Store
Olympia Ski and Cycle
Orange Poppy
Out of the Blue
Pastry Castle
Platform Gallery
Plug In ICA
Prairie Fire
Pure Essence Spa Salon
Red River Books
Urban Shaman
Winnipeg Folk Festival + King's Head Pub
Thank you to Tracy Koga from Shaw TV for taking the time to interview us about this amazing event.



Above: John, a Shaw TV Cameraperson, with an Art's Bday postcard in hand

…and thank you to CityTV for welcoming us onto Breakfast Television… as we were in the studio Tuesday, January 15, 2008.

Heather and our Programming Coordinator talked about the history of
Art's Birthday and about all the exciting things that were happening at Club
Desire etc..

At Video Pool, we love art, and we love parties, and we were thrilled to continue our tradition of
bringing international Art's Birthday celebrations to Winnipeg!

In
1963, French Fluxus artist Robert Filliou declared that on January 17,
one million years ago, art was born when someone dropped a dry sponge
into a bucket of water. A deliberate yet playful act left open to
chance… who knew art would evolve to become something so culturally
significant?

To recognize the worldwide appreciation of art,
Video Pool hosts this evening of performances, contests,
interactive fun, and other goodies. The night began with a
VJ-style new media performance by Ryan Stec (Winnipeg/Ottawa), which was followed by an experimental electronic music set, by
internationally renowned Venetian Snares (Budapest/Winnipeg). Mama Cutsworth, a local
favourite, took over the stage as well, and
kept the party going by spinning funky vinyl into the wee hours.



COSTUMES: Everyone was welcome to be creative and party in costume. The theme selected by
the International Art’s Birthday Committee for 2008 was “Forever Young”…
unique interpretations of this were encouraged!




CAKE:
What
is a party without cake? People brought a real or surreal cake to the
party to enter it into a competition and to be judged by a panel of
“experts”. Last year's judges were 
Morley Walker (Winnipeg Free Press), John Kendle (Uptown Magazine) and
Tracy Koga (Shaw TV).
Prizes were awarded in the following categories:

  1. The Hal Johnson and Joanne McLeod Body Break Award– for the cake most likely to contain vitamins or beneficial nutrients
  2. The Stanley Cup – for the cake with the ‘smoothest’ icing 
  3. The Bell Canada Titanium Timbit – for the cake project most likely to receive Canada Council funding 
  4. The Darwin Award – for the most primordial cake reflecting art’s humble origins 100,000,045 years ago. 
  5. The Blizzard Award – for the cake most likely to have been purchased at a St. Vital Dairy Queen 
  6. The Istvan Kantor Li’l Debbie Log d’Or – for the cake that provokes the most intense reaction in the genital region




MEDIA GIFT EXCHANGE:
 
In
order to participate in this one,
all you needed to do was bring a wrapped media item, and get
creative. This may be a quirky 8-track or vinyl
record you uncovered at a garage sale, a VHS tape you found in your
basement, a clip of found video that you've captured onto DVD, or a
selection of strange audio samples burned onto CD.  The idea was that
everyone would bring a gift and take another mystery one home at the
end of the night.
 

RAFFLES:  The gifts and surprises didn't end there as there were also a few draws for great items from fantastic local merchants!
Art’s
Birthday was and always is a chance for one and all to come together and have a
wonderful time in the name of Art. It is an event that gets bigger and
bigger each year, and it is not to be missed, so join us next year and be a part
of the action!

During the days leading up to Art's Birthday, Ryan Stec spent a few
days working on-site, preparing footage and planning his performance.
Here's a pic…


Art's Bday Photos

The following selection of photos were taken by Michael Talastas and Charles Venzon of incidencephotography.com. Please visit their site for more fantastic shots!

















































































Thank you, once again, to Michael and Charles for documenting the night and sharing the pics with us!

The following selection of images were taken at Art's Birthday 2008 by John Coutanche.

Enjoy!









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Jeanne Randolph & Glen Johnson

Winnipeg, MB (April 16, 2008) – Video Pool Media Arts Centre proudly presented an evening of performative lectures on creativity and technology by Jeanne Randolph and Glen Johnson.

Psychiatrist and cultural theorist Randolph uses psychoanalytic methods and concepts, themselves amenable to productive misuse, to reveal the ways in which technological devices and/or their depictions are open to creative and critical interpretation. Johnson projects digital slides in a manner reminiscent of corporate culture and middle management to support his thesis that technology has ruined art, while Randolph uses a technology associated with yesterday’s middle-school science teachers and art historians – the conventional slide projector – to comment on mass media culture. Through a hilarious presentation based on classical scholarship, Johnson took his audience back to scenes of Lascaux, urging artists to abandon “all this technological nonsense” and to “go back to crushing berries and burning sticks.”

ARTIST BIOS

Jeanne Randolph is one of Canada’s foremost cultural theorists. A practicing psychiatrist, Randolph is also known as a performance artist whose extemporaneous soliloquies (on topics varying from cat curating to boxing to Barbie dolls to Wittgenstein) have been performed in galleries and universities across Canada as well as in England, Australia, and Spain.

Glen Johnson is a performance and installation artist whose work invariably involves text. He has delivered faux-lectures to stunned audiences in at least two provinces. He has hung a bed on one wall and nailed tiny words to another. He has performed at aceartinc, The Annex, Gallery 803, Platform Gallery, Mount Saint Vincent University, the University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He is largely responsible for the website www.persiflage.ca. He received a Bachelors Degree in Classics from the University of Winnipeg in 1993 and expects that some day they will ask for it back.

These performances were presented thanks to generous financial support from The Canada Council for the Arts, The Manitoba Arts Council, and the Winnipeg Arts Council.

Video Pool thanks the Winnipeg Film Group for their generous presentation support.

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Art’s Birthday January 17

Video Pool Media Arts Centre Celebrated Art's 1,000,045th 2008 Birthday at Club Desire on 441 Main St.




 

    Video Pool is extremely grateful to have received such     generous support
from so many local friends including     merchants, arts organizations, an
art collective, and a     band.

Enormous thanks are owed to:
Advance Electronics
American Flamewhip
L’Atelier national du Manitoba
Aqua Books
Bikram Yoga Winnipeg
Blue Earth Organics
BorderCrossings Magazine
Cinematheque
The Fyxx
Hooper’s Bazaar
The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, Manitoba
Into the Music
Kustom Kulture
The Line Up
Mac Helper
MAWA
Mondragon
Mother’s Music/The Drum Store
Olympia Ski and Cycle
Orange Poppy
Out of the Blue
Pastry Castle
Platform Gallery
Plug In ICA
Prairie Fire
Pure Essence Spa Salon
Red River Books
Urban Shaman
Winnipeg Folk Festival + King's Head Pub


    Video
Pool is thrilled to have the support of local merchants and would like to thank the
        Pastry Castle, which has generously donated a birthday cake for us to
share!





    Thank you to Tracy Koga from Shaw TV for taking the         time to interview us about this amazing event.

    Left: John, a Shaw TV Cameraperson, with an Art's Bday     postcard in hand.

    Heather and our Programming Coordinator             talked about the history of
Art's Birthday and about all the exciting things that were happening at Club
Desire etc..

    …and thank you to CityTV for welcoming                                                                                         us onto Breakfast Television… as we were in                                                                                     the studio Tuesday, January 15, 2008.



At Video Pool, we love art, and we love parties, and we were thrilled to continue our tradition of
bringing international Art's Birthday celebrations to Winnipeg!

In
1963, French Fluxus artist Robert Filliou declared that on January 17,
one million years ago, art was born when someone dropped a dry sponge
into a bucket of water. A deliberate yet playful act left open to
chance… who knew art would evolve to become something so culturally
significant?

To recognize the worldwide appreciation of art,
Video Pool hosted an evening of performances, contests,
interactive fun, and other goodies. The night began with a
VJ-style new media performance by Ryan Stec (Winnipeg/Ottawa), which was followed by an experimental electronic music set, by
internationally renowned Venetian Snares (Budapest/Winnipeg). Mama Cutsworth, a local
favourite, took over the stage as well, and
kept the party going by spinning funky vinyl into the wee hours.

And as always Art’s Birthday was a chance to get involved!

COSTUMES: Everyone was welcome to be creative and party in costume. The theme selected by
the International Art’s Birthday Committee for 2008 was “Forever Young”…
unique interpretations of this were encouraged!




CAKE:
What
is a party without cake? People brought a real or surreal cake to the
party to enter it into a competition and to be judged by a panel of
“experts”. Last year's judges were 
Morley Walker (Winnipeg Free Press), John Kendle (Uptown Magazine) and
Tracy Koga (Shaw TV).
Prizes were awarded in the following categories:

  1. The Hal Johnson and Joanne McLeod Body Break Award– for the cake most likely to contain vitamins or beneficial nutrients
  2. The Stanley Cup – for the cake with the ‘smoothest’ icing 
  3. The Bell Canada Titanium Timbit – for the cake project most likely to receive Canada Council funding 
  4. The Darwin Award – for the most primordial cake reflecting art’s humble origins 100,000,045 years ago. 
  5. The Blizzard Award – for the cake most likely to have been purchased at a St. Vital Dairy Queen 
  6. The Istvan Kantor Li’l Debbie Log d’Or – for the cake that provokes the most intense reaction in the genital region




MEDIA GIFT EXCHANGE:
 
In
order to participate in this one,
all you needed to do was bring a wrapped media item, and get
creative. This may be a quirky 8-track or vinyl
record you uncovered at a garage sale, a VHS tape you found in your
basement, a clip of found video that you've captured onto DVD, or a
selection of strange audio samples burned onto CD.  The idea was that
everyone would bring a gift and take another mystery one home at the
end of the night.
 

RAFFLES:  The gifts and surprises didn't end there as there were also a few draws for great items from fantastic local merchants!
Art’s
Birthday was and always is a chance for one and all to come together and have a
wonderful time in the name of Art. It is an event that gets bigger and
bigger each year, and it is not to be missed, so join us next year and be a part
of the action!

During the days leading up to Art's Birthday, Ryan Stec spent a few
days working on-site, preparing footage and planning his performance.
Here's a pic…

Art's Bday Photos

The following selection of photos were taken by Michael Talastas and Charles Venzon of incidencephotography.com. Please visit their site for more fantastic shots!

 

















































































Thank you, once again, to Michael and Charles for documenting the night and sharing the pics with us!

The following selection of images were taken at Art's Birthday 2008 by John Coutanche.

Enjoy!









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